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Vestibular neuritis (vertigo)

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  • Vestibular neuritis (vertigo)

    Hello I'm not sure if this is the correct forum for this post, but I an a personal trainer and my client was diagnosed with Vestibular neuritis. I wanted to know if and how this will effect training. Also what would you recommend for training going forward. Doctor recommended PT. Thank you

  • #2
    My client was mistaken and this is his diagnosis
    Diagnosis/ Symptoms: "BPPV of Left Ear"

    Procedure: Vestibular Rehab

    Special Instructions: evaluate and treat w/ Vestibular rehab regarding BPPV

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by matthewporter View Post
      My client was mistaken and this is his diagnosis
      Diagnosis/ Symptoms: "BPPV of Left Ear"

      Procedure: Vestibular Rehab

      Special Instructions: evaluate and treat w/ Vestibular rehab regarding BPPV
      BPPV = Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. I'd recommend finding a local clinician you can refer her to in order to help. In regards to training with you - I wouldn't necessarily alter what I do but would monitor for increase in vertigo based on movements and make adjustments accordingly.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thank you for your advice. I have another delema now the physical therapist that his doctor referred him to told him only to do light exercise (using the example of only cardio) , and absolutely no deadlift. I asked what the reasoning was for this and the therapist didn't give him any. I'm just a little unclear how to proceed. Before this his doctor told him no exercise for 3 weeks. I just don't know enough information to know if they are giving him good advice or is this something they are pulling out of thin air. It seem like they could be harming him from what they have told him he is afraid to do any exercise. I feel like they could have noceboed him.

        Comment


        • Eric Lagoy
          Eric Lagoy commented
          Editing a comment
          If the BPPV diagnosis is correct, symptoms typically clear up within a few weeks and a clinician trained in management of BPPV can actually be quite helpful. Exact severity of symptoms is highly variable, although can be quite disabling early on, so it is hard to say whether we would disagree or agree with the recommendations from the MD/PT.

          That being said, in my experience, if a patient is willing to continue to train they can likely train in some capacity and tolerate things fairly well. Typical recommendations from me may include limiting exercises that involve position changes of the head (think like an RDL), or doing more tempo work with them, and just being generally a bit slower with transfers from a bench to standing. Otherwise, modifications should become apparent as you work with this patient. If your chief concern is nocebo related, I think it is perfectly acceptable and within your scope to reach out to the client directly and ask if they have any concerns over prognosis, getting back after it when ready, and overall status/symptom severity.
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