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Conditioning to False Narratives - Articles to Read

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  • sooghs
    replied
    Thank you both so much! I’ll get busy reading and share these readings with my colleagues.

    Leave a comment:


  • MikeAmato
    commented on 's reply
    Derek beat me to it

  • MikeAmato
    replied
    Hi! Here's a good start, but this is obviously a deep, dense topic. The first two articles are from Darlow on the importance of words in low back pain, the 3rd is a more general article on the unintended negative effects of physician's words and the 4th is a patient perspective on what they expect from chiropractic care and issues with exercise adherence. That specific case example is not something I'm aware of that has been studied specifically, but this should give you a good start. I'd recommend exploring the references in each article as well.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24218376
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25811262
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29090307
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29430052

    Leave a comment:


  • Derek Miles
    replied
    These should get you started.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5799845/

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25811262

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27133031

    Leave a comment:


  • sooghs
    started a topic Conditioning to False Narratives - Articles to Read

    Conditioning to False Narratives - Articles to Read

    Hello BBM team!

    A frequent theme I have seen in BBM articles and other media is the under-recognized harm of conditioning patients to false narratives.

    I was wondering if you all had some articles or primary literature that discusses these harms in more detail, so that I can share with curious colleague?

    A particularly accessible example that comes to mind is that of an individual who depends on chiropractic treatment for their low back pain, based on the narrative that their spine is always in need of realigning, and that their pain experiences are necessarily caused by spinal misalignment.

    Then, should their chiropractor go out of town, the patient is left with no self-coping skills, hopeless in pain until their clinician returns, etc etc. is there literature reviewing cases like these?

    Thank you for everything you do!
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