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Potential Frozen Shoulder & Rehab

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  • Potential Frozen Shoulder & Rehab

    Hello and thanks for your time. My wife has consistent pain in her left shoulder, predominantly on the lateral deltoid. She is performing rehab movements without weight as given to her by her medical team. She believes the pain is activity specific and continues to engage in the activities concerned. The movements do not appear to be alleviating the pain. Her most painful movement is raising her arm above her head, whether unassisted or using a finger walk up a wall. I have suggested she incorporate light resistance in the form of rowing motions using bands or light dumbbells (3 - 5 lbs based on comfort) but she is concerned that she has or could injure her shoulder doing so. She does not lift weights and is post-menopausal.

    Any suggestions?

  • #2
    Originally posted by user1 View Post
    Hello and thanks for your time. My wife has consistent pain in her left shoulder, predominantly on the lateral deltoid. She is performing rehab movements without weight as given to her by her medical team. She believes the pain is activity specific and continues to engage in the activities concerned. The movements do not appear to be alleviating the pain. Her most painful movement is raising her arm above her head, whether unassisted or using a finger walk up a wall. I have suggested she incorporate light resistance in the form of rowing motions using bands or light dumbbells (3 - 5 lbs based on comfort) but she is concerned that she has or could injure her shoulder doing so. She does not lift weights and is post-menopausal.

    Any suggestions?
    Hey user1 - thanks for the questions. It is difficult for us to provide individual advice and recommendations without speaking with your wife directly via consultation; which we do offer remotely. I noticed the title of this thread as "frozen shoulder". Usually when I am giving this narrative or see others doing so, we are seeing marked reductions in range of motion compared to the opposite upper extremity. The rehabilitative approach is usually centered around education about meaning of symptoms based on the individual's understanding and then appropriately dosed activity to return range of motion and function, which for me often includes loading to tolerance. Hope that helps. We'd be happy to consult with her. If you all are interested, please complete our intake paperwork HERE.

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    • #3
      Thanks Michael, it does help. I would say the range of motion is significantly reduced in that she can still move her arm around but not without significant pain, with some movements being more painful than others. Activities like cooking (lifting, and holding suspended, pots and pans) also aggravates the shoulder.

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