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  • #16
    Originally posted by Jordan Feigenbaum View Post

    This is true, but the symptoms of the over 90% of "injuries" documented during RT resolve in under two weeks. We agree that how you define injury matters, which include some metric of severity and consequence in most, but not all studies.

    Just wanted to clarify this.
    If you'll indulge me:

    I'm trying to make sense of the fairly large discrepancy between cross-sectional studies and the RT's you're referring to. I'm aware of the issues with retrospective studies like recall bias and the resulting data being generally of low quality, but the BMJ systematic review (https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/51/4/211.full) cites a study that recorded much longer periods of symptoms:

    In the study by Raske and Norlin, the athletes self-reported that 25% of their injuries were chronic, 20% were acute muscle injuries and the rest were not defined. The authors did not report any difference between weightlifters and powerlifters. Raske and Norlin also reported that 93% of the shoulder injuries, 85% of injuries to the low back and 80% of the knee injuries resulted in symptoms that lasted for more than 4 weeks.

    Now the obvious are the definition of injury, the severity of symptoms, and to what degree they affected training, but I don't have access to the full study. I read another similar analysis that indicated chronic/recurring injury being somewhat common (adjusted OR 1.54: https://www.strongerbyscience.com/po...es-background/), as well as a cross-sectional study indicating some injuries (I think it was around 40-50%) having symptoms lasting more than a few months, although I frustratingly can't find it now. I don't know if that caused significant alterations to training but in the realm of "this constantly hurts and sucks" as it pertains to longevity, it does leave me somewhat ambivalent.

    Now I also don't know if this is an issue of specificity (many powerlifters seem to only train a handful of exercises), or purely load, but even load and intensity seemed to not be as predictive as thought in some of the literature. Do you have a rundown of the RT's anywhere? Or did I just miss it in an obvious place? This is probably more relevant to my thread on deadlifting, but my current conclusion is mainly that powerlifting elicits more injuries due to load management (obviously) as a result of training volume/intensity but also "system load".

    Anecdotally, a lot of powerlifters do seem to be beat up by the time they're in their 50's. But on the other hand, likely a personal bias from sport-specific training, the goal of powerlifting training is the movements done in powerlifting; we rarely had athletes in pain or injured in the gym, but then the point of the gym in their case (hockey players, fighters, etc) was to build capacity for their sport in which they were obviously injured at one point or another.
    Last edited by RVR; 08-04-2021, 06:38 PM.

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    • #17
      Anecdotally, a lot of powerlifters do seem to be beat up by the time they're in their 50's.
      As I mentioned in an earlier thread, what is your sample population for this anecdote? I wouldn't think of older youtube personalities as a cautionary examples for myself. Guys who used performance enhancing drugs to get their lifts into astronomical numbers might be dealing with nagging injuries now, but I'm in my 50's and have never been stronger. Just came in 2nd (in the open class) at meet last weekend against guys half my age. The entire point of RPE training is to get stronger with a healthy amount of stress. Age isn't a factor in a good training program.
      Last edited by sjalbrec; 08-06-2021, 04:05 PM.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by sjalbrec View Post

        As I mentioned in an earlier thread, what is your sample population for this anecdote? I wouldn't think of older youtube personalities as a cautionary examples for myself. Guys who used performance enhancing drugs to get their lifts into astronomical numbers might be dealing with nagging injuries now, but I'm in my 50's and have never been stronger. Just came in 2nd (in the open class) at meet last weekend against guys half my age. The entire point of RPE training is to get stronger with a healthy amount of stress. Age isn't a factor in a good training program.
        I tried to reply there but it's moderated and my posts weren't approved.

        Yeah that's a good point. A variable that seems to pollute the data is PED use, definitely, and it's difficult to get a good handle on injury rates in non-competitive or casually competitive lifters. Couple that with self-selection in various sports and the many variables surrounding proper programming, RPE use, etc and it's difficult to draw conclusions. It does seem to be safe to say that powerlifting the way BBM advocates is likely pretty safe in the long run, especially the way some would practice it via adding variations, higher rep phases, etc.

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