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Adaptation for Dummies

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  • Adaptation for Dummies

    Hi All,

    Okay for the man that requires things to be explained in crayon on A1 paper, can you explain how the body chooses to adapt in the context of strength, hypertrophy and conditioning?

    My remedial understanding is as follows:

    1. If you do strength, hypertrophy and conditioning say, in the one session, your body favours one particular element over the rest....conditioning. Is this true? I can imagine this is due to energy resources imposed on the body due to the length of time you spend on conditioning (LISS say) than on your combined time lifting ( excluding rest) . Therefore doing conditioning on the same workout as the strength and Hyper work
    will take away from getting bigger and stronger?

    2. Strength and hypertrophy go hand in hand, i.e. in order to get stronger once neurological adaptations take place then hypertrophy ( volume at a given intensity) is king whilst conditioning is endurance. Again if my understanding is correct, sweet. Therefore it stands to reason you can combine both strength and hypertrophy work in the one session without the body being in conflict about what to do in terms of adaptation?

    2.a Do neurological adaptations continue indefinitely or do they come to a stop? Does it follow the same law of diminishing returns as with strength?

    3. Conditioning should be done a minimum set time from when you finish strength/hyper work. Is this true? Should the conditioning be done on separate days to minimise reductions in gainz?
    In a previous article by Dr J on the BBM website that if you are stuck for time you would do 45 mins of strength work and 15 min HIIT training, presumably this not optimal but you could expect to see some results over a given period.

    4. To get a higher 1RM you must practice singles at a high enough intensity (90%+), however volume at a lower intensity ( 70-85%) is what drives overall strength improvement. Is this just the simple explanation on the body becoming more efficient ( engaging full motor units compared to engaging enough) ? if your 5/4/3 RM goes up then your 1RM goes up due to adaptation to the volume and intensity but not at the same rate as if you mixed singles in?

    So an example : 2No lifters, twins, both have an E1RM 100kg. On test day1 gets 1RM 90kg and the other 100kg ( other factors could determine performance on a given day we are assuming that the lifters are perfect) the only variable is how the lifters approached training. 1 incorporated both singles and volume and the other did no singles but only volume.


    5. Thoughts on personalising a template program to suit needs ( time, goals etc) take point 4 as one example, will it hurt you long term not doing singles all the time? I.e. on a peaking program you will be doing heavy singles - triples towards the end of the program anyway? Another example would be adjusting for body recomp while strength training, like more accessory work during GPP days to drive hypertrophy/fix weaknesses/ spread the work over more days to manage fatigue and time constraints. ( relates to points 1 & 3 )

    If you guys have covered this in another post/podcast , please point me in the right direction and I shall review it.

    I am just trying to understand the processes so I can apply to my own programming for my training. Currently on week 6 of the revised strength template and wanting to do 2 things once finished running it.
    1. I can program a strength maintenance phase while body recomping - less fat more gains ( currently 6ft 1" and 250lbs + with a 42 inch mid section, 38 inch hips, 35yr old) then
    2.do the strength program with some minor modifications to address time constraints and weaknesses ( I can work out 4-5 days a week for 90 mins a go so ideally doing 3 days a week strength work, 2GPP days, typically 3 days strength 1 GPP day)


    All the Best


  • #2
    Originally posted by Walker View Post
    1. If you do strength, hypertrophy and conditioning say, in the one session, your body favours one particular element over the rest....conditioning. Is this true? I can imagine this is due to energy resources imposed on the body due to the length of time you spend on conditioning (LISS say) than on your combined time lifting ( excluding rest) . Therefore doing conditioning on the same workout as the strength and Hyper work
    will take away from getting bigger and stronger?
    If you do it all in one session, then there is likely to be an interference effect present, particularly in less-trained individuals.

    Originally posted by Walker View Post
    2. Strength and hypertrophy go hand in hand, i.e. in order to get stronger once neurological adaptations take place then hypertrophy ( volume at a given intensity) is king whilst conditioning is endurance. Again if my understanding is correct, sweet. Therefore it stands to reason you can combine both strength and hypertrophy work in the one session without the body being in conflict about what to do in terms of adaptation?
    There is no such thing as strictly "strength" and strictly "hypertrophy" work. There are elements of both anytime you lift weights, though the relative effects can be "skewed" through manipulating loading intensity.

    Originally posted by Walker View Post
    2.a Do neurological adaptations continue indefinitely or do they come to a stop? Does it follow the same law of diminishing returns as with strength?
    They are most prevalent at the beginning of training (adaptations related to voluntary activation, rate coding, NM recruitment, skill & changes in co-contraction, and many other things), whereas hypertrophy is thought to take on a greater relative significance over time. But no, they do not come to a stop unless you actually detrain.

    Originally posted by Walker View Post
    3. Conditioning should be done a minimum set time from when you finish strength/hyper work. Is this true? Should the conditioning be done on separate days to minimise reductions in gainz?
    In a previous article by Dr J on the BBM website that if you are stuck for time you would do 45 mins of strength work and 15 min HIIT training, presumably this not optimal but you could expect to see some results over a given period.
    In a lesser-trained individual who needs to do conditioning, keeping conditioning volume < 30 minutes and keeping it separated in time (if same day) or on a separate day would be better from an interference effect standpoint. However, if you can't do that and need to combine them on a given day to get your work in, do what you have to do. Additionally, the more trained you get, the better you tolerate training stress and recover, so it becomes less of a big deal over time.

    Originally posted by Walker View Post
    4. To get a higher 1RM you must practice singles at a high enough intensity (90%+), however volume at a lower intensity ( 70-85%) is what drives overall strength improvement. Is this just the simple explanation on the body becoming more efficient ( engaging full motor units compared to engaging enough) ? if your 5/4/3 RM goes up then your 1RM goes up due to adaptation to the volume and intensity but not at the same rate as if you mixed singles in?

    So an example : 2No lifters, twins, both have an E1RM 100kg. On test day1 gets 1RM 90kg and the other 100kg ( other factors could determine performance on a given day we are assuming that the lifters are perfect) the only variable is how the lifters approached training. 1 incorporated both singles and volume and the other did no singles but only volume.
    Practicing singles improves your ability to perform heavy singles through various mechanisms. If you don't practice them, but exclusively do 5s, for example, your 1RM will go up less than it would have by including singles.

    Originally posted by Walker View Post
    5. Thoughts on personalising a template program to suit needs ( time, goals etc) take point 4 as one example, will it hurt you long term not doing singles all the time? I.e. on a peaking program you will be doing heavy singles - triples towards the end of the program anyway? Another example would be adjusting for body recomp while strength training, like more accessory work during GPP days to drive hypertrophy/fix weaknesses/ spread the work over more days to manage fatigue and time constraints. ( relates to points 1 & 3 )
    I don't understand the question. Are you asking whether programs should be tailored to an individual's goal's? Of course.

    Originally posted by Walker View Post
    I am just trying to understand the processes so I can apply to my own programming for my training. Currently on week 6 of the revised strength template and wanting to do 2 things once finished running it.
    1. I can program a strength maintenance phase while body recomping - less fat more gains ( currently 6ft 1" and 250lbs + with a 42 inch mid section, 38 inch hips, 35yr old) then
    2.do the strength program with some minor modifications to address time constraints and weaknesses ( I can work out 4-5 days a week for 90 mins a go so ideally doing 3 days a week strength work, 2GPP days, typically 3 days strength 1 GPP day)
    1. Sure.
    2. Sure.


    IG / YT

    Comment


    • #3
      Austin,

      Thanks for getting back to me, this is great and helps a lot with my understanding! Currently only been lifting for 2 years so trying to fill in the gaps so I can improve on getting stronger whilst maintaining a sensible weight. Enjoying learning about programming and look forward to future content from yourselves!

      Sorry about point 5, yes it is about tailoring to specific needs, which is required as training goals etc come into play. What I was trying to ask was;

      1. thoughts on moving singles to latter weeks similar to block periodized models. So for example, take the strength template singles and introduce them a little later in the program in order to be able to get in all the volume. and save time to allow my supplemental lift work to get done.

      So Week 3 - day 1 is comp squat and press do the 5x5, follow the progression to week 6 then add the singles in when the volume begins to reduce. Essentially saves me time in the gym.

      Or as I can get to the gym 4-5 days a week,can I do the supp work on GPP days with minimal detrimental effect? So do my LISS/HIIT then go do my supp work or do vice versa?

      2. powerbuilding/ hypertrophy biased programs : Am I right in saying that is what the hypertrophy template on the BBM effectively is? Doing comp lifts with just enough volume and intensity in order to maintain strength but heavy on accessory work to drive size/ recomp and work capacity?

      Again, apologies for making simple questions complicated!

      Cheers

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