Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Maintaining LBM in a deficit and defining overtraining

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Maintaining LBM in a deficit and defining overtraining

    I'm a 26 year old male, intermediate/advanced lifter who has recently gained some excess adipose tissue and is concerned whether the programming I'm doing will be sufficient to maintain my lean body mass. I just got through the first 4 weeks of the 12 week strength and see that I've gained a bit too much fat mass. My concern is that the volume on this particular program starts to go down at this point and I'm not sure that would be ideal since I'm now starting to lose weight. I decided to switch to the hypertrophy template. Was this a good move? Does higher volume begin to regress? How is that regress measured?

    Also, how does one define overtraining? I understand that it is a myth but I also know that too much stress is diminishing so wouldn't that be "overtraining"? Or is overtraining defined by fatigue and not volume?

    Thanks

  • #2
    Originally posted by eric48180 View Post
    I'm a 26 year old male, intermediate/advanced lifter who has recently gained some excess adipose tissue and is concerned whether the programming I'm doing will be sufficient to maintain my lean body mass. I just got through the first 4 weeks of the 12 week strength and see that I've gained a bit too much fat mass. My concern is that the volume on this particular program starts to go down at this point and I'm not sure that would be ideal since I'm now starting to lose weight. I decided to switch to the hypertrophy template. Was this a good move? Does higher volume begin to regress? How is that regress measured?
    It doesn't matter from a LBM maintenance standpoint. I would've just stayed on the 12 WS on maintenance calories or slightly below.

    Originally posted by eric48180 View Post
    Also, how does one define overtraining? I understand that it is a myth but I also know that too much stress is diminishing so wouldn't that be "overtraining"? Or is overtraining defined by fatigue and not volume?

    Thanks
    We don't define overtraining in resistance training, as it's not been shown to actually exist. In endurance training, it's a syndrome of symptoms coinciding with marked reduction in training responsiveness and performance.
    Barbell Medicine "With you from bench to bedside"
    ///Website /// Instagram /// Periā„¢ Rx /// Whey Rx /// Barbell Medicine Podcast/// Newsletter /// Seminars ///

    Comment

    Working...
    X