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Are tempo variations bad for strength and hypertrophy?

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  • Are tempo variations bad for strength and hypertrophy?

    In the latest Newsletter Jordan wrote about velocity training:

    Intentionally slowing down the eccentric or concentric portion of the lift tends to dampen strength and hypertrophy adaptations compared to using the lifter's preferred eccentric velocity and maximal or near-maximal volitional concentric velocity.
    In this context, does it mean that using tempo variations is not recommended when somebody's goals are strength and hypertrophy related? What is the reason to use temp work then?

  • #2
    Not necessarily- everything is a balance based on specific aims of the programming. We like tempo work for fatigue management, form work, etc. They're not great for strength or hypertrophy on their own, but in the context of an entire program, they can be appropriate.
    Barbell Medicine "With you from bench to bedside"
    ///Website /// Instagram /// Peri™ Rx /// Whey Rx /// Barbell Medicine Podcast/// Newsletter /// Seminars ///

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    • archang
      archang commented
      Editing a comment
      If I'm not mistaken, don't the studies that tend to show attenuated strength / hypertrophy outcomes for intentionally slowed concentrics / eccentrics use extremely slow tempos? (i.e. tempos far slower than a 3-0-3)

  • #3
    Does tempo work have a potential to keep a tendinopathy at bay?

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    • #4
      Originally posted by Dr. Hades View Post
      Does tempo work have a potential to keep a tendinopathy at bay?
      Not in a way that is directly due to the cadence.
      Barbell Medicine "With you from bench to bedside"
      ///Website /// Instagram /// Peri™ Rx /// Whey Rx /// Barbell Medicine Podcast/// Newsletter /// Seminars ///

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      • #5
        Then a tempo work coupled with an appropriate load would be the case? I mean, I wouldn't myself go as far to say that this *alone* would prevent a tendinopathy, But I wonder if tempo work at an appropriate load in the context of an entire program might have the potential to keep tendinopathy at bay. Would that be reasonable?

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        • #6

          If I'm not mistaken, don't the studies that tend to show attenuated strength / hypertrophy outcomes for intentionally slowed concentrics / eccentrics use extremely slow tempos? (i.e. tempos far slower than a 3-0-3)
          Some of them, yes!


          Then a tempo work coupled with an appropriate load would be the case? I mean, I wouldn't myself go as far to say that this *alone* would prevent a tendinopathy, But I wonder if tempo work at an appropriate load in the context of an entire program might have the potential to keep tendinopathy at bay. Would that be reasonable?
          I think insofar as it contributes to appropriate load management you could say that.
          Barbell Medicine "With you from bench to bedside"
          ///Website /// Instagram /// Peri™ Rx /// Whey Rx /// Barbell Medicine Podcast/// Newsletter /// Seminars ///

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