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doing negatives for people too weak to do chins = part-and-parcel to a bunk paradigm?

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  • doing negatives for people too weak to do chins = part-and-parcel to a bunk paradigm?

    For as long as any living person can remember, a common way to progress on chins for people without the strength to do them at the start has been to do sets of negatives. Recent BBM insights reveal that strength is contraction-type specific, and therefore an improvement in a persons ability to do the negative portion of a chin should have no effect on their ability to do concentrics.

    Are we to say, then, that everyone who believes that doing eccentrics helped them get their first chinup is simply hallucinating? I don't want to start using a bunch of corny terms like "phenomenology" and "lived experience" here, but I feel like I have to ask... are you guys really COMPLETELY sure that there is no carryover between doing eccentrics and doing actual chinups?

  • #2
    Recent BBM insights reveal that strength is contraction-type specific, and therefore an improvement in a persons ability to do the negative portion of a chin should have no effect on their ability to do concentrics.
    These are not "our" insights, and that conclusion does not follow (see below).

    I feel like I have to ask... are you guys really COMPLETELY sure that there is no carryover between doing eccentrics and doing actual chinups?
    I feel confident that I have not said this.

    When we discuss things like the specificity of strength adaptations, people seem to take this to imply that there is no effect whatsoever in any other context, which is not the case (and is a reductionist understanding of "specificity"). Concentric-only training tends to produce proportionally greater increases in lifting strength, while eccentric-only training tends to produce proportionally greater increases in lowering strength. However, eccentric contractions (particularly when loaded above maximal concentric strength, as in the chin-up example) can actually induce adaptations (e.g., muscle structural changes) that result in improvements in concentric strength as well.

    https://medium.com/@SandCResearch/do...h-ec66197b0f5c
    IG / YT

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    • #3
      Strength is specific, hypertrophy is general. If doing negative chins causes the muscles to grow contractile tissue then that would likely improve strength in a variety of contexts, including concentric strength.

      I am glad that I followed Austin's advice and read Beardsley's "Strength is Specific" book. It provides a good framework for answering these types of questions.

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