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Understanding Programming - S-R-A cicle

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  • Understanding Programming - S-R-A cicle

    Hi,

    After months of founding SS and binge reading everything i could find related to Programming, i am now starting to think the concept of the "S-R-A cicle" is not real, or at least not as linear as it is portrayed in PPST. According to the book you stop being a novice when you are no longer able to show performance improvements 72h after the "overload event". This is the case because your "S-R-A cicle" is now longer so you need more time to recover. Honestly the first time i read the book this made alot of sense, but right now i am not so sure. Lets imagine the following scenario:

    We have 3 lifters, A, B and C. Lifter A is only able to make 8 pound jumps, lifter B 5 pound jumps and lifter C 2 pound jumps. Assuming they are genetically equal and that they are running an advanced novice type of setup for their squats, i think its fair to say that lifter A would stall first, lifter C would stall last and lifter B (the classic SS aproach) would stall somewhere in the middle. Does this mean that their "S-R-A cicle" is now longer/they were not recovered? If that was the case they would stall with the same weight.

    Ultimately failling the NLP only means that you are no longer able to put 10 pounds(lifter B) on your squat every week, even if under optimal stress (Assumming NLP provides optimall stress). Because you have now trained for months you dont respond to training as robustly as you once did, and therefore the rate at which you gain fitness does not allow for the progression the program demands.

    Again, how does the theory of the S-R-A cicle fit into this? Thanks for any help!

  • #2
    SRA is real and I'm not sure that it is portrayed any differently than in PPST.

    Your thought experiment doesn't work either.

    Failing on NLP means you are not applying enough stress to the lifter to put weight on the bar every training session.
    Barbell Medicine "With you from bench to bedside"
    ///Website /// Instagram /// Peri™ Rx /// Whey Rx /// Barbell Medicine Podcast/// Newsletter /// Seminars ///

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    • #3
      Why does the experiment fail?
      If applying more stress was enough to keep the LP alive, we would just transition from advanced novice to stronglifts or something similar and we would keep progressing by 10 pounds a week. In the end SS and Stronglifts stop working because of the same reasonb(progression is too agressive), thats why their average stall weights are basically the same. Right?
      Thanks in advance.

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      • #4
        Any thoughts on Mike T's emerging strategies approach?

        One of his observations seems to be that the SRA process can be repeated twice a week (M/T and then Th/F) even among world competitive lifters (allowing for more focused observation and iteration of programming).

        Furthermore, he seems to assert that progress is never really linear and that patience is required to determine the undulating patterns of Response to Stress and Adaptation.

        In short, among intermediate, and even advanced lifters, can stress be administered in two day segments, allowing for twice-weekly adaptation and progression?

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        • #5
          Ummm... Quick Google of "S-R-A cicle" autocorrects to circle and comes up with Satanic Ritual Abuse.

          How did I get pulled in to this?

          I'm out.

          It was nice knowing you all.

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          • #6
            Let me make it clear that i dont disagre with your last sentence. For people less sensitive to training (older guys), lack of volume can absolutely be the reason their LP stops. Thats why a intermediate program with the same weekly volume (like TM) ends up not working for this population. They end up grinding harder every week and think their recovery is lacking when in reality the reason its getting harder is because they are not getting any stronger.
            Still i dont understand why you say the experimente doesnt work. Especially with younger trainees that end up having some success with programs with very similar volumes/intensity (TM).
            Anyway, thanks for the feedback Jordan.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by LAntunes View Post
              Why does the experiment fail?
              If applying more stress was enough to keep the LP alive, we would just transition from advanced novice to stronglifts or something similar and we would keep progressing by 10 pounds a week. In the end SS and Stronglifts stop working because of the same reasonb(progression is too agressive), thats why their average stall weights are basically the same. Right?
              Thanks in advance.
              You could go from advanced novice (which actually reduces stress slightly in many cases) to stronglifts and increase the weight or improve strength by other objective metric. The real issue is that it's becoming very difficult to accrue enough stress in a single session to drive the adaptation. Intermediates recover better from a given stress compared to a novice because they are more trained.

              "In the end SS and Stronglifts stop working because of the same reasonb(progression is too agressive), thats why their average stall weights are basically the same. Right?"

              No. They stop working because the incorrect stress is applied.
              Barbell Medicine "With you from bench to bedside"
              ///Website /// Instagram /// Peri™ Rx /// Whey Rx /// Barbell Medicine Podcast/// Newsletter /// Seminars ///

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              • #8
                Originally posted by pgx View Post
                Any thoughts on Mike T's emerging strategies approach?

                One of his observations seems to be that the SRA process can be repeated twice a week (M/T and then Th/F) even among world competitive lifters (allowing for more focused observation and iteration of programming).

                Furthermore, he seems to assert that progress is never really linear and that patience is required to determine the undulating patterns of Response to Stress and Adaptation.

                In short, among intermediate, and even advanced lifters, can stress be administered in two day segments, allowing for twice-weekly adaptation and progression?
                Mike and I talk pretty regularly. It should come of no surprise to you that I agree with him on this- though again it's rarely linear..

                Barbell Medicine "With you from bench to bedside"
                ///Website /// Instagram /// Peri™ Rx /// Whey Rx /// Barbell Medicine Podcast/// Newsletter /// Seminars ///

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