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  • Speed work?

    Hi,

    During warmups at the meet I participated in last weekend, the two best deadlifters had that style where they lift super-fast (rip the bar off the ground) and then slam it back down. One pulled in the 600's and the other guy hit something like 727 for his third attempt. Is this a coincidence or could incorporating speed work improve results?

    I didn't understand why they both slammed the bar back down, as why practice that movement when you can't do it on the platform? I guess they were showing off/psyching themselves up?

    Unfortunately, the guy who was lifting in the 600's tore his bicep during his last attempt. Never good to see that muscle rolled up. He was in the danger zone already (lifting very heavy with a mixed grip), but could speed-work increase the chances of a bicep tear?

  • #2
    SJ,

    A few things:

    1) Many lifters have unique ways of performing the lifts. Some, me included, try to move each warm up as fast as possible to both prime the nervous system for the task at hand, and to accurately gauge strength potential for the day. This is different than doing "speed work" however. In any event, I would advise most individuals to lift weights as fast as possible on the concentric.

    2) I do not think speed work, e.g. high velocity training at light weights, helps powerlifters.

    3) Mixed grip isn't really dangerous per se'.

    -Jordan
    Barbell Medicine "With you from bench to bedside"
    ///Website /// Instagram /// Peri™ Rx /// Whey Rx /// Barbell Medicine Podcast/// Newsletter /// Seminars ///

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    • #3
      Jordan,

      Thanks for the response and for correcting my use of the term "speed work". You're absolutely correct, I should have said "warming up with very fast reps".

      Do you think there's a correlation between vertical jump performance and the benefit of warming up this way?

      I'm definitely not there yet with respect to judging my RPE based on when the warm up weight starts to feel slower. I keep all of my warm up reps at the same slow speed and concentrate on form. I don't think I'd ever want to get as violently fast as these guys were, but I'll give warming up with faster reps a try.

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      • #4
        I don't think there's a significant correlation between velocity of warm up reps and vertical jump, no. Could be?!
        Barbell Medicine "With you from bench to bedside"
        ///Website /// Instagram /// Peri™ Rx /// Whey Rx /// Barbell Medicine Podcast/// Newsletter /// Seminars ///

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