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Question about lifting weights and striking power

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  • Jordan Feigenbaum
    replied
    Improving strength, specifically high velocity force production can increase striking power. This can be done using many different exercises and/or implements, but the weights will have to be lighter to allow for the required velocity.

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  • thicky
    started a topic Question about lifting weights and striking power

    Question about lifting weights and striking power

    Hello again BBM crew,

    I hope you're all well.

    When the benefits of lifting weights are discussed, a significant increase in striking power (mostly regarding punching and/or kicking) is often brought up as an argument.
    On the other hand, others would argue that lifting weights makes you "sluggish" and slow(er).
    All other things being equal (technique, mass of the athlete, fatigue levels, ...), I'm somewhat sceptical toward both of those statements, since striking is a sport-specific movement that's substantially different than squatting, deadlifting, benching etc., and I simply don't see why lifting weights would decrease one's speed if the fatigue levels are managed and the motor patterns of striking are kept in a conditioned state.
    To clarify, I'm a supporter of resistance training for multiple reasons (one of the more important ones being injury risk reduction). I just think that there are more beneficial exercises than the big 4 to focus on for pure punching power.

    However, I'm well aware that you guys are substantially more experienced than me with regards to strength training, so I'm wondering if you could share your insights regarding that topic.
    One counter-argument to my own point of view would be that changes in lean body mass *without* changes in weight (i.e. increasing muscle-to-fat ratio) potentially increase athletic performance.

    Thanks in advance,
    T

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