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high reps and connective tissues

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  • high reps and connective tissues

    Hello,

    I've been seeing this info on different forums and websites lately. Claiming that high reps (50 to 100) can improve connective tissue strength and health. That it forces more blood and fluids into these areas delivering more nutrients.

    Is there any real data out there that supports this hypothesis? If connective tissues are avascular, how can you push more blood into them? It would give you a good muscle pump, sure. But can you really force more blood into areas with no blood vessels being present?

    I guess you would be moving more synovial fluid around them. But wouldn't that happen with normal strength training anyway? And would all those reps put you on a path to a repetitive strain injury?

    Just curious what your thoughts are on this.

  • #2
    Yea, this is made up- which you can tell by someone using the term "connective tissue health". I'm not exactly sure what that is, but I'd ask for a definition and then for evidence supporting the claim.
    Barbell Medicine "With you from bench to bedside"
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    • #3
      I have seen recommendations from a variety of sources for high-rep sets, especially using slow eccentrics, for a variety of tendinopathy-type pain. In my limited experience using tons of slow light barbell curls (sets of 30 with sloooow eccentric) to resolve distal biceps tendon pain, it seemed to work. Even if you accept that this works, though, it doesn’t really prove a specific mechanism, but it is fun to speculate.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by jfsully View Post
        I have seen recommendations from a variety of sources for high-rep sets, especially using slow eccentrics, for a variety of tendinopathy-type pain. In my limited experience using tons of slow light barbell curls (sets of 30 with sloooow eccentric) to resolve distal biceps tendon pain, it seemed to work. Even if you accept that this works, though, it doesn’t really prove a specific mechanism, but it is fun to speculate.
        Heavy slow resistance training has lots of evidence for efficacy, though the weight- not the volitional eccentric- is what makes the reps move slowly.
        Barbell Medicine "With you from bench to bedside"
        ///Website /// Instagram /// Peri™ Rx /// Whey Rx /// Barbell Medicine Podcast/// Newsletter /// Seminars ///

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