Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

MYO Reps v.s. regular rep & set scheme?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • MYO Reps v.s. regular rep & set scheme?

    Dear BBM crew,

    First time posting after lurking for years. First of all I'd like to thank you for all the valuable information that have shaped my training for all these years, please keep up the good work!
    Recently I saw the post regarding MYO-Reps (https://www.barbellmedicine.com/blog/myo-reps/) on the blog by Leah. My question is: how is MYO-Reps compare to regular traditional, say "[email protected] with 2mins rests between sets", in terms of Hypertrophy stimulus? Since both method accumulates pretty much the same volume, same intensity (provided the weight used are the same for those sets) will there be any difference at all? If they are the same perhaps should I just do MYO-reps for my assistance exercises (arm works, isolation exercises for example)?
    Thank you!

  • #2
    No one knows, but I wouldn't expect any difference.
    Barbell Medicine "With you from bench to bedside"
    ///Website /// Instagram /// Peri™ Rx /// Whey Rx /// Barbell Medicine Podcast/// Newsletter /// Seminars ///

    Comment


    • #3
      From what I've heard doing myo rep sets can generate a lot of fatigue, so that's one thing to manage. I enjoy doing them for my home workouts right now, even on things like pushups and single-arm rows.They're a good tool for lighter loads. I've read Borge Fagerli's Myo-reps ebook and thought it was a great read. The programs in the book have you doing them mainly on isolation movements. He does not recommend them on movements where the lower back would become heavily involved when approaching muscular failure, for example no myo-rep deadlift sets or even barbell squats. In the myo rep ebook those compound movements are prescribed as traditional heavy sets, rounded out with myo-rep sets on isolations or "lower risk" movements when approaching failure in the activation set.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by druidark View Post
        From what I've heard doing myo rep sets can generate a lot of fatigue, so that's one thing to manage. I enjoy doing them for my home workouts right now, even on things like pushups and single-arm rows.They're a good tool for lighter loads. I've read Borge Fagerli's Myo-reps ebook and thought it was a great read. The programs in the book have you doing them mainly on isolation movements. He does not recommend them on movements where the lower back would become heavily involved when approaching muscular failure, for example no myo-rep deadlift sets or even barbell squats. In the myo rep ebook those compound movements are prescribed as traditional heavy sets, rounded out with myo-rep sets on isolations or "lower risk" movements when approaching failure in the activation set.
        Yea we would disagree with everything you wrote here. The fatigue generated is unlikely to be any different than traditional sets taken to similar exertion levels. The entire notion about risk, particularly of the lower back, is entirely made up nonsense.


        A good resource on myo-reps: https://www.barbellmedicine.com/blog/myo-reps/
        Barbell Medicine "With you from bench to bedside"
        ///Website /// Instagram /// Peri™ Rx /// Whey Rx /// Barbell Medicine Podcast/// Newsletter /// Seminars ///

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks for answering Dr. Feigenbaum. I have several BBM templates and I've seen the traditional sets & reps are prescribed along with MYO Reps in the same template e.g. "MYOReps for exercise X" and "3 sets of 12-15 for exercise Y", or "MYOReps for exercise A" and for the next block in the template replaced by "AMRAP then 3 sets of 12". What's the reason behind these different rep scheme assigns? Are there some exercises better off do one rep scheme (e.g. MYO Reps) over the other? Or is it really just personal preference since it doesn't really make much difference as you mentioned?

          Comment


          • #6
            Mostly time spent training, fatigue management, and proximity to failure. Check out the myo-rep article linked above!
            Barbell Medicine "With you from bench to bedside"
            ///Website /// Instagram /// Peri™ Rx /// Whey Rx /// Barbell Medicine Podcast/// Newsletter /// Seminars ///

            Comment

            Working...
            X