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Compensating for form fix

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    Jordan Feigenbaum
    Moderator

  • Jordan Feigenbaum
    replied
    Originally posted by The_Toby View Post

    Hi Jordan,
    this is an interesting and maybe underappreciated point given that most RPE charts seem to link RPE to RIR.

    In particular with regard to heavy singles, RPE and RIR do not correspond well for me. E.g., a single at RPE 8 is estimated as 92% of the 1RM. A 92% weight does feel considerably lighter than a true 1RM, but e.g. for the deadlift, I don't think I'd be able to lift that weight for 3 reps.

    Do you have any further guidance on how to rate RPE for heavy singles?

    Thanks in advance,

    Toby
    I think you can use them however you want, provided it's consistently the same. For singles, I usually try and think of them as meet attempts. For example, a 1 @ 8 should feel like an easy second attempt or hardish opener. You could use RIR explicitly if you wanted.

    Leave a comment:

  • The_Toby
    Member

  • The_Toby
    replied
    Originally posted by Jordan Feigenbaum View Post
    That said, I don't think we should strictly use RPE to be RIR, e.g. how many reps left in the tank and that's it. I think RPE should encompass the exertion you felt during the set, the RIR, and to some extent- technique.
    Hi Jordan,
    this is an interesting and maybe underappreciated point given that most RPE charts seem to link RPE to RIR.

    In particular with regard to heavy singles, RPE and RIR do not correspond well for me. E.g., a single at RPE 8 is estimated as 92% of the 1RM. A 92% weight does feel considerably lighter than a true 1RM, but e.g. for the deadlift, I don't think I'd be able to lift that weight for 3 reps.

    Do you have any further guidance on how to rate RPE for heavy singles?

    Thanks in advance,

    Toby

    Leave a comment:

  • adapter
    Junior Member

  • adapter
    replied
    Doc, thanks so much! I admit I was a little surprised at your answer, but I think that's mainly because of pre-conceived notions I had about RPE, what a "good" rep should look like, and the relationship between the two.

    While I was a little surprised at the response, I'm also hugely gratified by it. I feel you've given me the green light to continue to progress without expecting perfection in my reps. And you're absolutely right about the other squat loads with different rep and set schemes.

    As usual, your respect for (and mastery of) "nuance" produces good analysis and advice...even without all the inputs! Thanks again, and take care,

    Leave a comment:

  • Jordan Feigenbaum
    Moderator

  • Jordan Feigenbaum
    replied
    I guess it depends what you're trying to do. If you're trying to demonstrate your near maximal strength, I'd expect some form breakdown. While I can't see your squat from here, I'm not sure that I'd agree it's quad weakness and that getting more horizontal on the way up should be avoided. There's a lot that would go into that decision, but it's nearly impossible to squat without using your quadriceps a whole lot.

    I don't know that I'd lower the weight by 10% without adjusting RPE. I'd bet there are weights <10% from your "other" squat technique's loads using different rep and set schemes that you can manage to do how you want them.

    That said, I don't think we should strictly use RPE to be RIR, e.g. how many reps left in the tank and that's it. I think RPE should encompass the exertion you felt during the set, the RIR, and to some extent- technique. If it were me, I would aim to hit a 9 (1 RIR, hard exertion, some form breakdown probably) and keep trying to get better over time. A lot of this stuff will come out in the wash as you keep training and working on it. I just don't see a good reason (from here) for a specialized approach.

    Leave a comment:

  • adapter
    Junior Member

  • adapter
    started a topic Compensating for form fix

    Compensating for form fix

    Hey BBM gang! Hope all is well with everyone.

    I'm getting near the end of Powerbuilding I (week 8). As my squats have gotten heavier (for me), a definite "good morning" kind of form is creeping in. Based on a number of things, I'm pretty sure it's due to quad weakness, so I'm doing goblet squats and trying to learn front squats to get some additional quad development going. I know it will take a while to get my quads to contribute more to my squat.

    In the meantime, I'm continuing with the program as written, but I've cut my low bar squat weight by 10%. That seems to be enough that I can squat with good form. However, when the program calls for RPE 9, I can't get there squatting those weights for 6 reps...I'm hitting RPE 7, maybe 7.5.

    I decided to just add a couple more sets to each session, to make up for the lower RPE, get the needed stress but still keep the form from deteriorating.

    Does this approach make sense to you guys, or is there a better way to skin this cat?

    Thanks in advance, you folks are the best!
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