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1st success bulk

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  • 1st success bulk

    I've never managed to complete what I would consider a successful bulk. I've always gained strength but I've also managed to gain more fat than I'm comfortable carrying which effectively ends my bulk prematurely.

    With the advice from this forum I think I've managed to correct a few of the pitfalls from previous attempts.

    I'm still struggling with what should trigger calorie adjustments during my bulk.

    I'm starting at 155lbs (6ft) and my working sets for the main lifts are S - 285, B - 165, D - 325 OHP - 115 so plenty of room in weight and strength departments.

    I always read that you should make an adjustment based on your goal. My current goal is to add strength, not necessarily to gain weight, but I know I likely won't have one without the other.

    Lets say I add 5 lbs (160lbs) before I add strength [(160 × 16.9) - (155 × 16.9) = 84.5 kcal]. Would that mean I have to eat more since I'm heavier? Or should I only add calories once I'm making strength gains and I stall?

    And what should my increments be? Ideally I'd like to stay as lean as possible throughout.

  • #2
    I think the Socratic method will be useful here

    If there were one thing that would definitively tell you if your energy intake is appropriate for your stated goals, what would it be?

    There isn't an "optimal" increment that reliably works best for everyone, but you could do 200-500 Calorie changes, as needed.
    Barbell Medicine "With you from bench to bedside"
    ///Website /// Instagram /// Peri™ Rx /// Whey Rx /// Barbell Medicine Podcast/// Newsletter /// Seminars ///

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    • Josebnls
      Josebnls commented
      Editing a comment
      I guess I'm not really sure what answer I was expecting to get. I am an over thinker, but I'm very disciplined, so I just wish there was a rigid path I could follow.

      I'll just try and be conservative with calorie increases based solely on progressive overload.

  • #3
    I would NOT base energy intake on progressive overload or, more correctly, progressive loading, as this would be unlikely to result in the correct management.

    Rather, your change in weight and waist circumference changes over time should dictate what you do to your energy intake.

    Since humans respond uniquely to training and dietary interventions, there isn't a rigid plan that fits everyone.
    Barbell Medicine "With you from bench to bedside"
    ///Website /// Instagram /// Peri™ Rx /// Whey Rx /// Barbell Medicine Podcast/// Newsletter /// Seminars ///

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