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Have I got the idea?

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  • Have I got the idea?

    Hello Doctors!

    I've been quite impressed by the work the BBM crew has been doing thus far and so I've been binging on your material for the last couple of weeks.

    I would like to know from you if I have developed a correct understanding of the fundamentals: Is it true that the goal of a strength-training program is to manage a titration of volume performed at intensities above 70% of 1RM while preventing; or, at least, mitigating- the deleterious effects that fatigue has upon the ability to perform that necessary work?

    I'd also like to know if you recommend a SSLP "plug-in" for a stuck squat and deadlift similar to what you recommend for the presses. My idea for my deadlift is to keep alternating it with rows & chins but perform both a heavy single with +5% of my previous set of 5 and two back-off sets with 85% of the heavy single. Weights for all sets will be increased 5-10lbs each workout. Would that be appropriate?

    Thanks for your time.

  • #2
    Is it true that the goal of a strength-training program is to manage a titration of volume performed at intensities above 70% of 1RM while preventing; or, at least, mitigating- the deleterious effects that fatigue has upon the ability to perform that necessary work?
    No, the goal of a strength training program is to generate increases in force production.

    Based on our understanding of the physiology of force production, we know that the fundamental factors include:

    1) Genetic/epigenetic inheritance (not modifiable with training)
    2) Anthropometry, muscle origins/insertions, etc. (not modifiable with training)
    3) Neuromuscular adaptation, including skill + recruitment (modifiable with training)
    4) Muscular hypertrophy (modifiable with training)
    5) Psychological factors (modifiable with training & education)

    Given that 1 & 2 aren't modifiable, we'll exclude them from discussion for now.

    #3 Requires regular practice and exposure to heavy loads.

    #4 Requires sufficient training volumes, the specific dose of which depends on the individual's baseline training status and current anabolic sensitivity. The only way to productively & sustainably train at higher volumes of work is for them to be delivered at an appropriate intensity that both allows for sufficient motor unit recruitment, but is also recoverable (both within and between workouts). This latter factor (i.e., being able to tolerate the necessary amount of training stress) requires sufficient work capacity / recovery capacity, which itself is trainable by training more.

    #5 Requires education and practice, as well as "immunization" against nocebo.

    Well, I suppose I just laid out our general model, and perhaps an outline for a few book chapters ...
    Last edited by Austin Baraki; 04-21-2018, 07:27 PM. Reason: corrections
    IG / YT

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