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Flu Shots

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  • Dhruv4
    replied
    Not saying this is you but people who either didn’t take anatomy and physiology or understand the subject tend to oppose vaccinations for some reason. It’s sad that even at a PT clinic I used to work at there were therapists who wouldn’t get it because of the standard “ I got the shot and I got the flu” excuse.
    I work in a pharmacy and it’s great to see people get the flu shot and engage with the pharmacist and technicians about questions they have about it and it gives the pharmacists opportunities to bring down and false truths they have about them. As posted above it cannot actually give you the flu and as we tell patients it takes two - six weeks for it to be effective so it’s natural for people who already have or get symptoms after the administration to think they got the flu due to the shot.

    TLDR get the shot, it’s safe. If you have any concerns, ask the person administrating the shot.

    Leave a comment:


  • UnPractical
    commented on 's reply
    https://youtu.be/qUEy55r49fY

  • Serack
    commented on 's reply
    Kermit's voice makes so much more sense now.

  • MitchellCole
    replied
    Vaccines are safe. Flu shots are safe. People don't understand how dangerous the flu can be.....or how bad polio, tetanus, etc were/are. You can get measles just by being in a room where an infected person was 2 HOURS EARLIER.

    Leave a comment:


  • UnPractical
    replied
    There's a tool called the "regret matrix" that made the decision easy for me. Basically, the regret matrix askes what possible outcomes you would regret the most and then you make a decision that excludes that outcome.

    A) Shot works, got the shot: No problem
    B) Shot works, didn't get it: My kid get the flu from me and dies
    C) Shot doesn't work, got the shot: I'm turned gay like all the frogs
    D) Shot doesn't work, didn't get it: The frogs are still gay, but I'm safe in my bunker in my tinfoil hat

    Assuming each possibility is 25% likely (which is NOT the case), my greatest "regret" scenario is B, so I get the shot.

    The choice is even easier to make when you realize that not all of those outcomes are equally likely.

    Leave a comment:


  • teddyd
    replied
    I get the flu vaccination every year. I got the flu once properly a few years ago and it was hell. I don't understand why someone would not get it. It costs bugger all and lowers the probability of contracting it massively. Those who don't get it are just playing the odds. Anyway, now with a kiddo, we all get the shot. Not worth it otherwise.

    Leave a comment:


  • MikeT
    replied
    46yrs old and never had one.

    Leave a comment:


  • UnPractical
    commented on 's reply
    Yeah, I got the Tdap back in August.

  • Serack
    commented on 's reply
    Right? Did you get the Tdap? That one's pretty important for new parents that are herd immunity minded. Pertussis (whooping caugh) is a significant risk for newborns until they have gotten their own vaccinations, and the shot you got back in the day has probably worn off. My area had a Pertussis outbreak not too long ago, and most of the people that caught it had been vaccinated back in middle school, but it was no longer effective.

  • UnPractical
    replied
    I just got mine over the weekend. I normally don't, but I have a newborn now which changes my risk assessment. I'll probably end up getting it every year now.

    Leave a comment:


  • cmoney
    replied
    get the damn flu shot

    Leave a comment:


  • bigbaltic
    replied
    It's not 100% necesary, but wy wouldn't you want something that could either completely eliminate the flu or drastically reduce symptoms if you have it? It's free with most insurance providers, or at the very least less expensive than being sick and hospitalized for the flu.

    The other poster's comment on herd immunity is important too. You get everyone who can be innoculized taken care of, and there is not a viable vector for the disease to spread to those who cannot take the vaccine.

    Leave a comment:


  • llaffin
    replied
    There was a big debate about this on the FB page:

    https://m.facebook.com/groups/140899...40024646242123

    Austin chimed in with some facts and literature.

    Tl;dr it's usually 40-60% effective at preventing the flu, and reduces symptoms in those who do still end up getting sick. It may cause non-specific symptoms after getting it since it does 'prime' the immune system, but the flu shot cannot give you the flu. There are some extremely rare side effects. The flu kills thousands and thousands of people every year (including some healthy adults), the flu shot, although not perfect, reduces your risk. There's also the aspect of herd immunity, which helps protect vulnerable individuals who cannot take vaccines. All in all, I think the benefit outweighs any potential rare side effect risk.

    Leave a comment:


  • ericjspencley
    started a topic Flu Shots

    Flu Shots

    It's that time of year and everyone is pushing to get flu shots. As someone who hasn't had the flu shot in nearly 10 years, I am curious where others stand on the matter. Has there been any actual scientific research pointing out that flu shots are 100% necessary/unnecessary? Someone's "natural herbal keto" blog is not research. Very curious to see what others have to say
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