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GPP Endurance Running Shin Splits

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  • GPP Endurance Running Shin Splits

    Just started GGP Endurance this weekend and already have shin splits from the 5k run. I know I can switch to row or bike but I really want to do the running. Anyone out there have any tips to help this? I've heard that walking backwards after the run supposedly helps?

  • #2
    Shinsplints are unfortunately a very nebulous term that does not correspond to one given diagnosis. My concern (qualification: I’m physical therapist) is it you may be developing a stress reaction. Increased repetitive loading that exceeds your body’s ability to perform bony repair just exacerbates this process and set you up for potential more severe complications. That said, some of the other Diagnoses commonly called shinsplints are posterior tibial stress syndrome, tarsal tunnel syndrome, and even potentially anterior exertional compartment syndrome. Without a more clear description of what your symptoms are, where you’re symptomatic and when in a run your symptoms begin to become worse, it’ll be hard to give you recommendations.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by NathanDailey View Post
      Shinsplints are unfortunately a very nebulous term that does not correspond to one given diagnosis. My concern (qualification: I’m physical therapist) is it you may be developing a stress reaction. Increased repetitive loading that exceeds your body’s ability to perform bony repair just exacerbates this process and set you up for potential more severe complications. That said, some of the other Diagnoses commonly called shinsplints are posterior tibial stress syndrome, tarsal tunnel syndrome, and even potentially anterior exertional compartment syndrome. Without a more clear description of what your symptoms are, where you’re symptomatic and when in a run your symptoms begin to become worse, it’ll be hard to give you recommendations.
      Nathan,

      To be transparent, I have no medical background. I am experiencing a mild-medium (4 out of 10) discomfort stemming from the extensor retinacula to the peroneus longus on the anterior side of both legs. This discomfort immediately follows any stint of running that I endure. As soon as I run about 1/4 mile I notice the symptoms start to arise. The next day, it will be fairly uncomfortable (5 out of 10) to walk up stairs. I assume this is due to the stretch/flex of my ankle. I have not frequently ran throughout my life but I have played ice hockey since I was 4 and never experience anything like this even after many many hours of skating.

      Thanks,
      Eric

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ericjspencley View Post

        Nathan,

        To be transparent, I have no medical background. I am experiencing a mild-medium (4 out of 10) discomfort stemming from the extensor retinacula to the peroneus longus on the anterior side of both legs. This discomfort immediately follows any stint of running that I endure. As soon as I run about 1/4 mile I notice the symptoms start to arise. The next day, it will be fairly uncomfortable (5 out of 10) to walk up stairs. I assume this is due to the stretch/flex of my ankle. I have not frequently ran throughout my life but I have played ice hockey since I was 4 and never experience anything like this even after many many hours of skating.

        Thanks,
        Eric
        In the absence of a physical exam I am hesitant to make or attempt to make a diagnosis here on this forum. That said, I would ask why you are set on running for the endurance template. It sounds as if you’re not particularly adept at or like running and are much more accustomed to non-impact forms of cardio. Unless your job (military, law-enforcement, fire/rescue) requires you to run, substitute something else in place of it.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by NathanDailey View Post

          In the absence of a physical exam I am hesitant to make or attempt to make a diagnosis here on this forum. That said, I would ask why you are set on running for the endurance template. It sounds as if you’re not particularly adept at or like running and are much more accustomed to non-impact forms of cardio. Unless your job (military, law-enforcement, fire/rescue) requires you to run, substitute something else in place of it.
          I guess I was just wondering if anyone had experienced this and had any easy fix. I plan to just go to the bike or rower for the rest of the program as I have absolutely zero issues with those. Thanks for your time though! Happy training

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          • #6
            How are your shoes? I was a really big runner back in the day, and certain shoes would cause shin splints, but others wouldn't. It might be worth trying a different pair of running shoes. Best thing you can do is find a running shoe specialty store near you, as the sales people will be trained in how to pick the right shoe for your foot and running style. Running shoes have a very complex selection, and not all running shoes are for all people. It is very important that you have shoes that are right for you as running in the wrong shoes for your style can cause injury. Aside from that, if your shoes are not the problem, it's likely just your bodies reaction to novel stress and it will likely adapt, though if it starts getting worse over time you may need to take a break, use one of the other forms of conditioning, and maybe retest the running thing later when you are at a better general conditioning level.
            Last edited by PWard; 05-16-2018, 10:11 PM.

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