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  • Deload

    Are deload weeks done to let the body and joints rest and heal or is there another reason for it.Also,are deloads just lower volume but intensity stays normal?

  • #2
    There's a lot of nuance.

    Deloading in the traditional sense is done to reduce fatigue. You can accomplish this by reducing volume, intensity, or both. However, if your main goal is strength you're better off keeping the intensity up (maybe even increasing it) and deloading by reducing volume to maintain strength adaptations.

    You'll find BBM tends to refer to a deload as either a low-stress week or a pivot. They both have 2 different functions though. A low-stress week is more of a traditional deload, reducing volume while maintaining or increasing intensity to allow the reduction of fatigue. This is generally done for one week. A pivot on the other hand will generally keep volume and relative intensity higher than a low stress week, but will radically change the training variables. This typically lasts for 2-4 weeks (Mike T says as a generality a pivot should be ~1/3 the time of a development block). Generally during a pivot you practice a bunch of variations, rep ranges, and training styles that you don't normally do. So typically the hallmarks you'll see in a pivot block are a lot of sets in the 10-15 rep ranges, myo-reps, bro work, no competition lifts, extra focus on GPP and conditioning, fun random stuff for the hell of it, etc. You're "deloading" here by changing the nature of the stress to the point that it no longer resembles your normal training stress. There are some added benefits in resensitization to training that come with a pivot as well. The tradeoff being that it takes more time.
    Last edited by PWard; 12-03-2018, 11:29 PM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by PWard View Post
      There's a lot of nuance.

      Deloading in the traditional sense is done to reduce fatigue. You can accomplish this by reducing volume, intensity, or both. However, if your main goal is strength you're better off keeping the intensity up (maybe even increasing it) and deloading by reducing volume to maintain strength adaptations.

      You'll find BBM tends to refer to a deload as either a low-stress week or a pivot. They both have 2 different functions though. A low-stress week is more of a traditional deload, reducing volume while maintaining or increasing intensity to allow the reduction of fatigue. This is generally done for one week. A pivot on the other hand will generally keep volume and relative intensity higher than a low stress week, but will radically change the training variables. This typically lasts for 2-4 weeks (Mike T says as a generality a pivot should be ~1/3 the time of a development block). Generally during a pivot you practice a bunch of variations, rep ranges, and training styles that you don't normally do. So typically the hallmarks you'll see in a pivot block are a lot of sets in the 10-15 rep ranges, myo-reps, bro work, no competition lifts, extra focus on GPP and conditioning, fun random stuff for the hell of it, etc. You're "deloading" here by changing the nature of the stress to the point that it no longer resembles your normal training stress. There are some added benefits in resensitization to training that come with a pivot as well. The tradeoff being that it takes more time.
      Thanks,that explains a lot.

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      • #4
        isnt the 13th week of the 12 week strength program, in essence, a deadlift week? it is meant to simulate a meet, however at the same time it has high intensity with barely any volume.

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