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Goal Setting and Intermediate Training

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  • Goal Setting and Intermediate Training

    The goal of the NLP is to get to the point where linear progression is no longer possible. Now, that you're at that point, what kind of strength GainzZz can be expected from going through the programs(obviously excluding programs not based on strength)? I realize this is nuanced to the program and individual - age, genetics, recovery hygiene, daily stress and more, but can we ballpark some stuff? Is there data around it? Similar to the stat that the mean NLP squat weight is 275lbs for example. Can I put 5% on my squat with the Bridge v1/v2? If not, what kinds of goals am I setting? I like to set goals and to make them as SMART (Specific Measurable Attainable Realistic Time-based) as possible.

    As an extension, what are the types of goals attached to other programs? For the Templates overall it may be informative to provide target goals so that program selection is clearer. Perhaps in a range....Sure, someone's thinking how much clearer can it be? For me for example, looking at the descriptions for the programs I can't decide which would be better for my goals (reach >1000lb total working weights with Squat, Deadlift & Press while having a <33" waist) - HLM, Bridge 2.0, or the Hypertrophy template. Since I have no interest in competing I think that eliminates The Bridge 2.0....

    How do you guys set your training goals?

  • #2
    You are correct that the answer is entirely dependent on the individual. Some very general analysis though: The SSLP adds 15lbs/week to your squat, then 10lbs/week with the advanced novice LP. It's reasonable for an early intermediate to add 5lbs/week to their squat for awhile. I find 5lbs/week to DL is reasonable for an early intermediate as well. Bench and press will obviously be less, usually 1 - 3lbs/week. I managed this progress rate on the Bridge 2.0 as a young healthy average male coming fresh off the SSLP. However, 5lbs/week is 250lbs in a year, which is typically a lot to put on your squat, so you can expect progress to drop to even lower rates after a few months, or after a few runs through the bridge/hlm. Again, it's entirely dependent on the individual though. Results may vary greatly.

    For the templates, the Bridge 1.0/2.0 and HLM are more geared towards early intermediates. They are general strength development templates with no emphasis on peaking, just weekly increases to your estimated 1rm. The 12 week strength or press templates are peaking templates where you test for a true 1rm on week 12.

    HLM or The Bridge 1.0/2.0 will both serve you well for your goals of getting a 1000lbs total, especially if you're an early intermediate.

    ​​​​​

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    • #3
      I just noticed there is a separate thread for Programming discussion. This probably should have been there. Oops.

      Thanks for the info. Sounds reasonable. Now, some followup:

      Alan Thrall recently posted a video where (near the end) he suggests the micro plates are only for Novices.... "time to pack your bags and move out of novice land". That's going to make it hard to get 1-3lb jumps for pressing.

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      • #4
        Yeah I've seen the video, and I don't know if I entirely agree. I understand his point that if you're using uncalibrated plates at a commercial gym, the micro loading may not be effective. But 5lbs jumps on the press is hard. I still use 1.25lbs plates for my bench and press and it's been working fine so far. Although with RPE based training using submaximal weights (like all of BBM templates), I suppose you could take bigger jumps less frequently.

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        • #5
          To me the idea that variance in weights make microplates useless is just utter nonsense. That's basically saying that since the big plates you use may vary you might as well take 5 lb jumps instead. Wut? So if your bar is already 5 lbs more than it should be it's best to add on another 5 instead of 2.5? Also, if your weights vary up and down and you microload you are still adding 2.5 lbs on average instead of 5 which is more manageable.

          That being said I only really use micro loading for press since I started the bridge though, because with RPE you are not necessarily making linear gains every week anyway. On bench I will just add 5 more lbs if I feel up to it. If I get it @8, great. If it's 8.5, no big deal, I'll just drop back.down 5. Doing say 205, 200, 200 when you could have done 202.5 for 3 across doesn't make much difference in the scale in intermediate programming.

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          • #6
            My upper body lifts are high intermediate, and my lower body lifts are low intermediate (years of neglect).

            My second run through the 8 week Bridge helped me add 5% on all lifts .

            Not sure if that's good or bad, just what I saw .

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Fosterions View Post
              I just noticed there is a separate thread for Programming discussion. This probably should have been there. Oops.

              Thanks for the info. Sounds reasonable. Now, some followup:

              Alan Thrall recently posted a video where (near the end) he suggests the micro plates are only for Novices.... "time to pack your bags and move out of novice land". That's going to make it hard to get 1-3lb jumps for pressing.
              Pretty sure that Alan's idea here is that if you feel the need to micro load everything, including your squat, THEN it's time to leave novice land. He is definitely in favor of small jumps for upper body work. And in the context of his whole video, he's pointing out that excessive reliance on micro plates for all of your training is not worth it, this also means that if you can't add 1-2 lbs for one session, it's a good idea to stay calm and not freak out about "not making progress".

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              • #8
                Thanks Leah, fair enough. So, if I am looking at my RPE calculator in my Barbell Medicine program and it suggests a deadlift for 299 I would do that for 300 and so on for lower body movements?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Fosterions View Post
                  Thanks Leah, fair enough. So, if I am looking at my RPE calculator in my Barbell Medicine program and it suggests a deadlift for 299 I would do that for 300 and so on for lower body movements?
                  Yes, the calculator is a tool and I would often round those numbers up or down.

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                  • #10
                    So, going back to intermediate goal setting... If I am reading my template right, as an early intermediate I can shoot for adding 25lbs to my e1RM for Squat and Deadlift and 5-6lbs to my e1RM for Bench and Press over a seven week program. So, this gives me targets and a bit of room over the seven week program. When I started this thread I had not yet bought a template and had not read the part in the RPE tab about weekly progression.

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