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Deadlift form check please

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  • Deadlift form check please

    Currently in 4th week of Powerbuilding 1.

    Someone mentioned that I'm not bending my legs enough prior to pulling.

    Any experienced advice welcome.


  • #2
    I dont know. Your thoracic spine gets into more flexion as the set goes on but other than that I don't really see anything wrong here.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by JMF123 View Post
      I dont know. Your thoracic spine gets into more flexion as the set goes on but other than that I don't really see anything wrong here.
      Thanks for your input

      Comment


      • #4
        Overall pretty good, but if I had to pick something to critique I'd say take a half second longer to really set you back and take in a big breath. THis should help you straighten that back out. You might have to lower your hips a touch more but that all depends on your anthropometry..

        Bigger question though: what in tarnation is the guy in the background doing?

        Comment


        • #5
          I'm gonna have to disagree here and say I think there's a pretty big issue with your technique. Whoever mentioned to you that your legs weren't bent enough was correct - your hips start too high and you're way too far out in front of the barbell. You're basically doing an SLDL and putting yourself in a disadvantageous position off the floor. Ideally, the barbell should be directly beneath the middle of your shoulder blades. This is your strongest position and allows you to pull the barbell in a (relatively) straight, vertical line. The barbell is completely behind your scapulas when you initiate the pull. I took a screenshot from your video and drew a vertical line straight up from the middle of the plates to illustrate this. I acknowledge that you might not have a perfect side view in this video, but it's a close enough where the angle wouldn't make it look that far off. Also, slow the video down to half speed and pay close attention to the bar path. After you break the floor, the bar starts to drift forward as it approaches your knees. This is your body fighting to get back into its strongest position - with the barbell under your shoulder blades.

          Click image for larger version

Name:	dead.png
Views:	158
Size:	191.8 KB
ID:	52078

          This shouldn't be too hard of a fix, you just need to tweak your starting position a bit. I feel like a good deadlift is like 95% starting position. Bend your knees forward and sit your hips back just a tad more than what you're currently doing. A rule of thumb I use in regards to knee positioning in a conventional deadlift is I try to make them flush with the front of my forearms. I suspect that your knees are a decent bit behind your arms. I don't know what your setup is like from start to finish, but I suspect that you are starting with your shins far too close to the barbell. I would suggest revisiting (or visiting for the first time if you haven't before) the Starting Strength 5 step deadlift setup. I think BBM's very own Alan Thrall has a video on it. Starting Strength, despite its flaws, is typically very good with basic technique/positioning stuff like this.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Nate B View Post
            I'm gonna have to disagree here and say I think there's a pretty big issue with your technique. Whoever mentioned to you that your legs weren't bent enough was correct - your hips start too high and you're way too far out in front of the barbell. You're basically doing an SLDL and putting yourself in a disadvantageous position off the floor. Ideally, the barbell should be directly beneath the middle of your shoulder blades. This is your strongest position and allows you to pull the barbell in a (relatively) straight, vertical line. The barbell is completely behind your scapulas when you initiate the pull. I took a screenshot from your video and drew a vertical line straight up from the middle of the plates to illustrate this. I acknowledge that you might not have a perfect side view in this video, but it's a close enough where the angle wouldn't make it look that far off. Also, slow the video down to half speed and pay close attention to the bar path. After you break the floor, the bar starts to drift forward as it approaches your knees. This is your body fighting to get back into its strongest position - with the barbell under your shoulder blades.

            Click image for larger version

Name:	dead.png
Views:	158
Size:	191.8 KB
ID:	52078

            This shouldn't be too hard of a fix, you just need to tweak your starting position a bit. I feel like a good deadlift is like 95% starting position. Bend your knees forward and sit your hips back just a tad more than what you're currently doing. A rule of thumb I use in regards to knee positioning in a conventional deadlift is I try to make them flush with the front of my forearms. I suspect that your knees are a decent bit behind your arms. I don't know what your setup is like from start to finish, but I suspect that you are starting with your shins far too close to the barbell. I would suggest revisiting (or visiting for the first time if you haven't before) the Starting Strength 5 step deadlift setup. I think BBM's very own Alan Thrall has a video on it. Starting Strength, despite its flaws, is typically very good with basic technique/positioning stuff like this.
            Thanks for your detailed input and the correction points also seem valid - it can be hard to see one's own faults so I appreciate that. I'll check that SS link out. Cheers.

            Comment


            • #7
              Dont konow how much it'll help but I always ask people if they are ticklish. If they are I tell them to tense their armpits the same way they would if someone was about to tickle them. Seems to work for thoracic tension.

              this in my experience helps people pay a little bit more attention to their starting position.

              It might be easier to see with a higher camera angle but im going to have to disagree with Nate, I know quite a few of successful DL'er who pull from a higher hip positioning and seems as though your camera is at a bit of an angle so to me it looks like your shoulder blades are in line(ish) with the bar and not to far forward. Not saying don't try messing with your hip positioning/bar position because you've got to find what works for you but I would also try playing with back tension. Pull more slack out of the bar
              (try it independent to the hip position at first and then try playing with both, that way you can find whats best for you.)

              and at the end of the day just keep deadlifting your doing awesome!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Bak2ThaBasix View Post
                Dont konow how much it'll help but I always ask people if they are ticklish. If they are I tell them to tense their armpits the same way they would if someone was about to tickle them. Seems to work for thoracic tension.

                this in my experience helps people pay a little bit more attention to their starting position.

                It might be easier to see with a higher camera angle but im going to have to disagree with Nate, I know quite a few of successful DL'er who pull from a higher hip positioning and seems as though your camera is at a bit of an angle so to me it looks like your shoulder blades are in line(ish) with the bar and not to far forward. Not saying don't try messing with your hip positioning/bar position because you've got to find what works for you but I would also try playing with back tension. Pull more slack out of the bar
                (try it independent to the hip position at first and then try playing with both, that way you can find whats best for you.)

                and at the end of the day just keep deadlifting your doing awesome!
                Thanks dude I'll try that - appreciate your comments

                Comment


                • #9
                  Dont konow how much it'll help but I always ask people if they are ticklish. If they are I tell them to tense their armpits the same way they would if someone was about to tickle them. Seems to work for thoracic tension.

                  this in my experience helps people pay a little bit more attention to their starting position.

                  It might be easier to see with a higher camera angle but im going to have to disagree with Nate, I know quite a few of successful DL'er who pull from a higher hip positioning and seems as though your camera is at a bit of an angle so to me it looks like your shoulder blades are in line(ish) with the bar and not to far forward. Not saying don't try messing with your hip positioning/bar position because you've got to find what works for you but I would also try playing with back tension. Pull more slack out of the bar
                  (try it independent to the hip position at first and then try playing with both, that way you can find whats best for you.)

                  I do agree with you that better lat engagement would help (it rarely hurts!) but in my opinion no amount of lat engagement alone will overcome what I perceive to be OP's issue. Diagnosing based off camera angle alone would be foolish, so let's disregard the line I've drawn, the bar path I've observed, and where I'm guessing his knees are relative to his forearms. I will say that regardless of the camera angle, it seems pretty apparent to me that OP is getting very little leg drive off the floor. These deadlifts are almost all back and glutes, much like an SLDL. In my opinion this is likely because his knees are not bent enough and his hips are too high, which is causing him to be unable to use his legs effectively - just my opinion, though. He is "pulling" with his back too much and not "pushing the floor away" with his legs enough. You are correct that there are many very strong deadlifters that start with a relatively high hip position (Kimberly Walford comes to mind). However, their hip height is 100% based on limb length (Walford has very long legs, for example). I am not convinced that OP shares this anthropometry. More camera angles and being able to see these deadlifts in person would be ideal, but we don't have that luxury.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Nate B View Post


                    I do agree with you that better lat engagement would help (it rarely hurts!) but in my opinion no amount of lat engagement alone will overcome what I perceive to be OP's issue. Diagnosing based off camera angle alone would be foolish, so let's disregard the line I've drawn, the bar path I've observed, and where I'm guessing his knees are relative to his forearms. I will say that regardless of the camera angle, it seems pretty apparent to me that OP is getting very little leg drive off the floor. These deadlifts are almost all back and glutes, much like an SLDL. In my opinion this is likely because his knees are not bent enough and his hips are too high, which is causing him to be unable to use his legs effectively - just my opinion, though. He is "pulling" with his back too much and not "pushing the floor away" with his legs enough. You are correct that there are many very strong deadlifters that start with a relatively high hip position (Kimberly Walford comes to mind). However, their hip height is 100% based on limb length (Walford has very long legs, for example). I am not convinced that OP shares this anthropometry. More camera angles and being able to see these deadlifts in person would be ideal, but we don't have that luxury.
                    Thanks Nate. I feel you may be right about the leg drive - something to investigate for sure.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Tried to make some adjustments despite distractions.


                       

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Nice pulls! I think you might’ve overcorrected your positioning a bit, though - it looks like you’re setting up a tad too far behind the bar now. This is evident in how you rock forward between starting the pull and when the plates actually leave the floor. Try to get over the bar in the position you’re in when the plates break the floor, then set your lats, push the floor away, and drag the bar up your legs.

                        Speaking of pushing the floor away, I noticed you’re doing a better job of driving with your legs. When you do, though, think about driving through your heels more. It looks like your balance point is a little too far out in the balls of your feet.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Nate B View Post
                          Nice pulls! I think you might’ve overcorrected your positioning a bit, though - it looks like you’re setting up a tad too far behind the bar now. This is evident in how you rock forward between starting the pull and when the plates actually leave the floor. Try to get over the bar in the position you’re in when the plates break the floor, then set your lats, push the floor away, and drag the bar up your legs.

                          Speaking of pushing the floor away, I noticed you’re doing a better job of driving with your legs. When you do, though, think about driving through your heels more. It looks like your balance point is a little too far out in the balls of your feet.
                          Thanks for your input again Nate - much appreciated.

                          Comment

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